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That's What They Say

THAT'S WHAT THEY SAY

 

"It is a great privilege to be able to work with, and I suppose work off, my feelings through sculpture." Louise Bourgeois, 1911-2010

Sculpture is a series of 3-dimensional shapes which, while fitting together, cause the perception of lines to the viewer, even where they do not exist. (Edward J. Fraughton)

Within every block of wood and stone, there dwells a spirit, waiting to be released. Direct carving is a way of freeing the spirit - my own and that of the stone or wood. (Hap Hagood)

When you slow down enough to sculpt, you discover all kinds of things you never noticed before. (Karen Jobe)

A piece of sculpture can have a hole through it and not be weakened if the hole is of a studied size, shape, and direction. Henry Moore1898 – 1986

I want to strip my work of 'effects' until it stands monolithic, based on reality and yet transcending it. It must flow naturally from my materials, from the way of the chisel and the way of the block... It is the ultimate ideal. Shiko Munakata 1903 – l975

Trivia Q&A Sept Oct 2013

Trivia Question

Q: Who was the youngest sculptor to receive a commission from the United States government to carve a statue of a president? (A record that still stands today) And who was the President?

Read more ...

June July 2013 Trivia

Question: Where is the largest sculpture park in the world?  Trivia Hint

                  The picture to the right has a clue in the background.

 


A. The largest sculpture park in the world is in Changchun, China, a city of more than 7 million people in Jilin province, 730 miles NE of Beijing. Containing a 27 acre park and over 100 contemporary sculptures, many monumental; Changchun is a must-see when you are in the neighborhood.

 

For lots of photos, search: largest sculpture park in the world, changchun

 

2013 Winter Party Trivia

Q. At what facility along the banks of the Columbia River, near Portland, Oregon, did this year's NWSSA revelers meet for their Winter Party?

 

 


A. Oregon member Kim Lewis, who works as Property Manager at Marylhurst, Oregon for the Sisters of the Holy Names, made arrangements for the 2013 Winter Party, at the Sister’s Historic Laundry Building. This 1907 building, totally renovated in 2004, housed the original boiler that provided heat for the Convent, Christie School Orphanage and Marylhurst College (now University). The nuns were the first teachers for the Oregon Trail settlers, and helped legalize private education by winning a US Supreme Court decision in the early 1930’s. Opening in 2001, the nuns sponsored the Mary’s Woods Retirement Community to be built, incorporating their own Convent into the structure. This beautiful facility now fulfills their mission for elder care to the public, providing independent living units through assisted and Alzheimer care.

Thank you, Kim for using your connections to secure this beautiful location for us. The turnout was not large, but those who traveled from Oregon, Washington and British Columbia certainly made merry.

Trivia Answers Nov-Dec 2012

We got two answers to our mystery woman question in the last trivia question. 

Trivia Question

Q: Can you name the standing woman and the sculpture she is working on?

A: From Frederic Chevarin:

The photo about Camille Claudel has been taken in 1887; the other lady is called Jessie Lipscomb. She was an English artist, friend to Claudel for some time. They collaborated to produce a few sculptures.

 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jessie_Lipscomb

 To be honest, it was easy for me to respond to the question as I have a book about Camille Claudel in French called “Camille Claudel Sa vie” by Odile Ayral-Clause Published by Bibliotheque Hazan. And I recognized the picture straight away. 100% luck ... I bought the book at the Rodin Museum, in Paris. There is a good few pages about her and Camille.


A: From Tracy Powel:   

 

Isn't that Jessie Lipscomb? Close friend of Camille, from England, worked with her in Rodin's studio in late 1880s. Don't know what she was working on.

I guess I am just a nerd. I read a lot, and collect books on my favorite subjects, and never quit studying. It took me a while to find the specific reference to Ms. Lipscomb, I wasn't sure of the spelling and had to verify it, and got distracted by rereading a lot of other stuff about Rodin and Claudel. It’s possible that she is working on a portrait bust she did of Camille during that period, but I can't tell from the picture. 

 

Click here to Read More about Jessie and Auguste and Camille in an article by Chip Cooper of coopertoons.com