Content
Event Booking
Web Links
Contacts
Tags
Categories
News Feeds

stone

  • 2016 Camp Brotherhood Wrap-Up

    29th Annual Stone Carving Symposium at Camp Brotherhood, Mount Vernon, WA
    July 9 - 16th, 2016

    2016CBGroup
    We had a wonderful week at Camp Brotherhood in Mount Vernon, WA with over 80 of our closest stone carving friends, celebrating camaraderie, knowledge and inspiration while working on a variety of stone; from jade pendants with Deborah Wilson to making custom tool grips and maquettes with Georg Schmerholz and watching Senden Blackwood transform a large Olivine boulder to a sleek and polished form. Instructors Tamara Buchanan and Ruth Mueseler mentored several beginning carvers in the "Tappers Tent" throughout the week.


    We had an amazing group of scholarship/work study members who assisted with set up and breakdown under the guidance of the Field Crew led by Pat Barton and Rich Andler, our Scholarship Auction organizer Therese Dougherty, Auctioneer Al Mangold, our Symposium Director, Cyra Jane, party planners Therese Kingsbury and Oliver Harwood - plus Bruce Wickler photographer/Jade tent assistant - all of whom made the week flow effortlessly.

    We celebrated with evenings on the deck outside Rogers Hall sipping wine to deep conversations around the campfire. And we invited the public to the field on Saturday for an Outdoor Sculpture Show - hundreds showed up and appreciated the effort and beauty of our creations.

    Laughter, fun, creativity and lifelong friends made.We look forward to another full week of stone carving next year (whether at Camp B, becoming Camp Korey or another destination) and hope you will join us!!

    Check out more photos from our event on our Facebook Page


    Thank you Bruce Wickler for these photos!
  • 2016 Outdoor Sculpture Show

    NWSSA's 29th Annual Outdoor Sculpture Show
    July 16, 2016
    Mount Vernon, WA

    Camp B Sculpture Show
     

    The Northwest Stone Sculptors Association Celebrates our 29th Anniversary with an Outdoor Sculpture Show on
    Saturday, July 16th, 2016 
    from 11 am - 4 pm


    Our week-long International Stone Carving Symposium culminates with a member art show in the meadow of Camp Brotherhood in Mt. Vernon. See over 80 artists at work, over 100 sculptures for sale, learn about the stone and tools used to create these 3-dimensional works of art. Rain or Shine!


    Camp Brotherhood at Treacy Levine Center
    24880 Brotherhood Road
    Mount Vernon, WA 98274

    For Directions, Click Here
  • 2017 Camp Pilgrim Firs Symposium Registration

    30th Annual International Stone Carving Symposium
    at Camp Pilgrim Firs, Port Orchard, WA 
    July 8th-15th 2017

    The Symposium PilgrimFirsFeild

    We invite you to join us at Camp Pilgrim Firs for up to eight full days of playing with stone, communing with nature, and enjoying the camaraderie of fellow stone enthusiasts. Bring yourself, your creative energy, your humor, tools, and a favorite piece of stone. If you don’t have stone or tools, we have an entire tent set up for beginners with tools and instructors.
    The Camp provides cabins and lodges that are connected by walking paths through the forested grounds and three full meals a day, so you’ll have the ultimate freedom to delve into carving and making friends. Evenings are filled with slideshows, informational talks, a hoot of a fundraising auction, a music-filled final night party, campfires and even nighttime swims in the lake.
    Stone and tools are available for purchase by our vendors.

    Accommodations
    The Camp has two lodges with shared common areas and bathrooms with multiple dorm-style rooms that sleep 3-4 people each. There are 11 duplex style cabins, each with private decks. For those who like to commune with nature, limited space is available for tents or campers.

    Sculpture Walk on the Meadow Saturday, July 15th
    We’ll host an outdoor art gallery that’s a perfect opportunity to show your work in a supportive and appreciative environment. We encourage everyone to bring a finished piece to display and to invite your friends! Bring pedestals if you have them. NWSSA takes a 20% commission.

    Registration
    Register online (below) or mail the attached form with payment to NWSSA, Attn: Cyra Jane, Symposium Director, PO Box 27364 Seattle, WA 98165
  • 2017 Suttle Lake Centerfold

    Suttle Lake Stone Carving SymposiumFellow stone sculptors,

    It is time to come home.  Be with friends, mentors, students, and especially, take the opportunity to be present with yourself. Our symposium is an evolving form of education, a union of ideas, and a place for gathering your energy.  When we work alongside one another, it is a statement. It is a proclamation that the earth can be moved by individuals and that it can be moved in harmony through collaboration.
    In August of 1987, NWSSA held our first annual international stone sculpture symposium. This landmark event coincided with a spectacular alignment of planets in our solarsystem, and coordinated meditation across the globe. 
    In August of 2017, we will again be hosting our annual Oregon symposium at Suttle Lake. It is fitting that we will kick off this event with another celestial alignment. We will witness a total solar eclipse the morning of Monday, August 21st. The next two total solar eclipses that will even be close to Oregon occur in 2045 in northern California, and 2099 in Canada.  The next total eclipse to pass over Oregon (or Washington) will not be until June 25, 2169!  

    Embrace the opportunity of a lifetime by sharing this special moment in the midst of an extreme concentration of creative energy.  
    We have a full program this year that is certain to push us into new ways of thinking.  Two themes of approach and technique will frame the 2017 symposium: high-tech & traditional and east & west.  

    Carl NelsonMichael BinkleyCarl Nelson and Michael Binkley will present on CNC carving andtransforming computer generated designs into stone. A small CNC carving machine will be on site during the week so that we can observe the process from start to finish. M.j. Anderson will follow this up by giving a field demonstration on carving Italian marble and will be carving and mentoring through the week. Keith Philips, resident artist of Tenino quarry, will visit and talk about traditional techniques for hand carving sandstone.End of copy on the left side of circle.Uchida-san
  • 29th Annual International Stone Carving Symposium

    PRESS RELEASE – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Media Contact:
    Renée Roberts, NWSSA Office Administrator
    206-395-9736 | This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. | @nwssa_renee | http://www.nwssa.org


    29th Annual International Stone Carving Symposium
    July 9-17, 2016
    Camp Brotherhood, Treacy Levine Center, Mount Vernon, WA


    The Northwest Stone Sculptors Association invites you to join us at the Treacy Levine Center at Camp Brotherhood for up to eight days of stone carving, communing with nature, and enjoying the camaraderie of fellow stone enthusiasts. Bring yourself, your creative energy, your humor, tools, and a favorite piece of stone. If you don’t have stone or tools, we have an entire tent set up for beginners with tools and instructors.

    Guest Artists:
  • Camp B 2016, July 9-16

    29th Annual International Stone Carving SymposiumCampB2016
    Camp Brotherhood
    July 9th-17th, 2016

    We invite you to join us at the Treacy Levine Center at Camp Brotherhood for up to eight days of playing with stone, communing with nature, and enjoying the camaraderie of fellow stone enthusiasts. Bring yourself, your creative energy, your humor, tools, and a favorite piece of stone. If you don’t have stone or tools, we have an entire tent set up for beginners with tools and instructors. 

    The Camp provides furnished lodge rooms and three full meals a day for the ultimate freedom to delve into carving and making friends. Tools and stone are also available for sale by our vendors. Sharing information, tips, and inspiration is something we all do. Evenings are filled with slideshows, informational talks, a hoot of a fundraising auction, a music filled final night party, campfires and more. You are also invited to bring a piece for the public sculpture show on the last Saturday.

  • Carl Nelson currently loves Olivene

    Carl Nelson currently loves OliveneCarl Nelson Olivene

    I don’t have a favorite stone, but I’m currently in a serious courtship with Olivene, better known to most of you as “dunite”.

    The stone, as found at the top of the Cascade Mountains by Mount Baker in Washington, is a tan orange on the outside and anywhere from a lime green with veins of deep blue green to an almost solid dark green. If found in the rivers and streams surrounding the Three Sisters mountains in Oregon, they are light tan with that same green interiors. See collection of river cobbles and big pieces from quarry.

    Olivene has a coarse hexagonal crystalline structure (1/16”-1/8”) with a preference to fracture along hexagonal planes. You can see these forms and fractures occurring in the outcroppings and when you attempt to bust apart a river cobble. In collection photo above you can see the difference between the rounded river cobbles and the orange tan quarry stone. Below is photo of one of the pieces from the south peak of the sisters and the inside of a 10 inch river cobble whose rind was cleaved off (note shoe for scale).

    Olivene works well with pneumatic tools (bushing and chiseling) for gross shaping, but the tools of choice for final work will be spinning diamonds. Sintered tools work well but electroplated do a nice job, last a long time, and are less expensive. It takes a high gloss reflective polish with diamond pads and/or paste.

    It’s easy to pull figurative as well as abstract shapes from the stone and has the quality of being translucent when made thin. It’s the translucency that has my interest and causes me to think about forms and ways to get light through a piece.
  • Daniel Michael on Marble

    Daniel Michael talks about stone and shows us a marble piece

    "Feather", 29” X 12” X 6”, marble, stone, steel, 2015Slowly walking through the morning air, listen to the warble of thrushes moving through the remaining trees around the wetlands. A haze of dust begins to rise above the green field. A cloud moves over the gathered workers and their canopies. An energetic flirtation begins. As usual, it seems to beam in from over there, that other. Looking back, it probably starts down in the unconscious local arena. This is reaching out, exploring the environment for something new. Humans have always done and excelled at this activity.

    Beginning anew. Begin anew. Begin. Then it all revolves around anew. This engagement of process with relationship amongst the multitude of things that seemingly make up the world of experience. It’s this unending discovery of novelty that the mind continues to play with, and ego suffers with. This constant interchange of energy and form sets up the ongoing business of creativity and relationship.

    With no thought about it, something suddenly enters into consciousness and gains the spotlight of attention. No warning buzzer, no drumbeat nor introductory preamble, just the flood of associated imagery and storytelling from all possible and imagined references. But wait, isn’t that the most beautiful and stunning piece of stone ever seen? That color, ahhh, it so much brings up this image. The shape itself now conjures some dancing embers of a fire that resembles another dream that is yet to be realized. Hmmm, crystalline structures catching light in just that manner to be seen, to be noticed.

    Yes, that, well, what if this one is moved over here. Stand it up on that vertical. Where does this now set up relation to the world? If, maybe it rolled around, the form from this side merging with the shape there. Oh, this storyline already begins to move towards form. Already the process moves along and tools begin to beckon awareness.

    What about hardness, softness, is it brittle? Spray some water; color explodes. Wait, wait, where was this song going, before the volume was pushed up, before the horns expanded the view? Beautiful, wonderful intensity. Walk away. Rush back. More water, please. Question the scale, the budget, the time. The whole commitment is questioned and yet, and yet it all flows so easily through all this activity.

    Seamlessly lost in the process, a new relationship is established. This new favorite is honored again and again with recurring activity and energetic ritual. The storyline slowly proceeds and locks into the immediacy of the moment. The past having been worn away in worked process, the tale continues toward tomorrow. And perhaps another stone?
  • Doratti Sculpture Studios Cuts Two Gargoyles

    Pat Doratti has his stone studio in Nelson, British Columbia a small arts city in the Rocky Mountains above Spokane Washington. The Cutting Begins - Patrick Doratti Sculpture Studios

    One of the interesting things he has there is a six axis robotic stone milling machine. Carl Nelson has worked with Patrick and this wonderful tool to create computer generated voids in some of his Dunite sculptures. 
    Well Along with the Work
    This article describes a commission Patrick has been working on. The client lives in a medieval style stone house near Calgary, Alberta. The job was to cut twin four foot high gargoyles from a five ton block of Carrara grey Bardiglio marble. No problem for Patrick and his magic cutter.

    Patrick started by splitting the marble block into two equal pieces with wedges and feathers and a ring saw. He then scanned a plaster model with his in-house 3-D laser scanner, cleaning up the scan with his CAD software. The finished scan was then put into his CAM software which details the milling instructions for the robotic cutter.


    Another view of the Robot at Work
    After the bottom of each stone was leveled with the robot, a large cutting head was used to remove the blocky, excess stone. 
    Then the intermediate milling was done to clean out the undercuts and hollows. The third pass was for the fine, detail work done in a zig zag pattern to finish the piece. The milling for each Gargoyle took about five days.

    Since the client wanted a pitted, old bronze look, the finished stone was sandblasted, then sanded with 400 and 800 grit, but leaving some rough spots. Making the Stone Look Ancient

    The required aging process uses a mix of black ash, oil, grease and a few other things. It was then wiped-down with a hand pad to achieve a matt finish with a very old weathered look. This takes some time, so it’s the gargoyles are still sitting in Pat’s shop being finished.

    As you can imagine, technology comes with price tag. The shop rate is $100/hour but can be a big savings in time for large projects and also allows the artist to do small multiples like you would with the bronze process. Patrick is open to working with the artist’s budget.

    You can reach Patrick Doratti through his email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

    Carving Complete on the Gargoyle Pair
  • July 16, 2016 Outdoor Stone Sculpture Show

    PRESS RELEASE – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Media Contact:
    Renée Roberts, NWSSA Office Administrator
    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. | @nwssa_renee | http://www.nwssa.org
    Outdoor Stone Sculpture Show
    July 16, 2016 11:00 am - 4:00 pm
    Camp Brotherhood, Treacy Levine Center, Mount Vernon, WA

    The Northwest Stone Sculptors Association Celebrates our 29th Anniversary with an Outdoor Sculpture Show on Saturday, July 16th, 2016 from 11 am - 4 pm
    Our week-long International Stone Carving Symposium culminates with an art show in the meadow of Camp Brotherhood in Mt. Vernon. See artists at work, learn about the stone and tools used to create these 3-dimensional works of art. Rain or Shine!
  • Keith Philips: Tools of the Trade

    Page from the Past...

    Keith Philips: Tools of the Trade by Terry Slaton

    Dressed as a 19th century instructor in a trade school he explained many things about the conditions when stone work was the major building method. Then he quick-changed into the garb of a turn-of-the-century stone cutter, or banker mason, with black coat, vest and derby, as a play on words. A banker mason worked on quarry blocks supported by big benches called "bankers", possibly from the French 'banquette', meaning bench. (Possibly not.) Lots and lots of tools were shown and demonstrated. My favorite was the pneumatic tool of choice of Scotsmen; Bagpipes! Keith pulled some from an un-toolbox-style case and proceeded to demonstrate them for us. Quite adequately, I might add.Page From The Past May-June 2005

    Terms were defined;
    A stone cutter makes the basic geometric shapes;
    A stone carver puts on the filigrees;
    And we sculptors do the crazy stuff.

    Other terms from the quarries:
    'Oiling the rooster' referred to the necessity of greasing the pulley block on top of the rigging pole, or rafter space of the shed. The young and fearless apprentices got this job.
    'Ringing of the square' was the foreman banging on a carpenter's square to get the yardworkers' attention.
    The striking faces of a 'penny face hammer' were the size of an Irish penny. And a man's tools were highly respected and guarded.

    Extractions from Keith's notes: Take pictures with a tape measure or other device to define the scale of the subject. When moving stone, plan ahead for where it's going. Pad the edges. Use momentum to carry the rock past neutral and onto another level of support. A plank and rollers can work well; and sand on an inclined plank can get big stuff out of a truck.

    We were awed with the precision demonstrations of tool work. Broken surfaces become smooth, smooth ones became scored, grooves and leaves appeared, fan shapes spread across the surfaces. Many examples of the styles and types of column caps and facings were on hand. He must have had a big truckload of tools and samples to pay for on the ferry.

    Other bits of info passed on to us
    Tool marks generally indicate hand carving, and undercutting definitely does, as moulds can't be removed properly from an undercut form/ Make several light passes when undercutting, and direct your strokes into the bulk of the stone. Keep your tools sharp. Use a red pencil for marking, as magic market can soak into the stone. Make patterns and guides with weather proof material, in case of rain, or a spilled cup of coffee. Patterns on transparencies can be used for mirror-image reproductions. Copyright-free patterns can be enlarged at Kinko's to use on any sized stone. When high in a structure, features can be less defined, should be larger than grade-level features, and tip out from the vertical surface.

  • Outdoor Stone Sculpture Show - Port Orchard

    The Northwest Stone Sculptors Association 
    Celebrates our 30th Anniversary

    with an Outdoor Sculpture Show 
    on Saturday, July 15th, 2017 
    from 11 am - 4 pm

    Arlist Newcomb "Guarding the Flock"Arlist Newcomb "Guarding the Flock"
    Our week-long 30th Annual International Stone Carving Symposium culminates with an art show at Camp Pilgrim Firs in Port Orchard, WA. 
    See artists at work, learn about the stone and tools used to create these 3-dimensional works of art. Rain or Shine!

    Camp Pilgrim Firs
    3318 Lake Flora Rd
    Port Orchard, WA 98367
  • Pilgrim Firs

  • SKULPT!

    Skulpt! Pop Up Stone Sculpture Gallery
    Pop-Up Stone Sculpture Gallery
    featuring local and international artwork
    available for viewing and purchase

    200 SCULPTURES - 40 ARTISTS - 3 STATES - 2 COUNTRIES - 30 DAYS!


    April 1-30, 2017
    11 am - 7 pm

    Historic Downtown Oak Harbor
    721 SE Pioneer Way


    Out of nowhere comes an amazing pop-up stone sculpture gallery in the middle of downtown historic Oak Harbor.  From the small to the immense, the full range of the sculptor’s art will be on display throughout April.

    Live carving demonstrations and artist receptions every Saturday.


    Created in conjunction with the 
    Oak Harbor Main Street Association
    and the Northwest Stone Sculptors Association



    Like Skulpt! on Facebook

    In the News:  
    Whidbey-Camano Islands.com

    Whidbey News Times
  • Stephanie Robison loves stone

    Stephanie Robison simply loves stone.

    I started my love affair with stone a little over ten years ago with Danby marble from Vermont. I was enamored by the sharpness of it, the predictability of how it breaks, the way it yields and responds to a chisel. Having tried many other types of stone, I keep coming back to marble. Marble is so lush and magical the way it sparkles. Even though marble holds the most allure for me, I would have to admit to feeling the most pure joy when carving limestone with just a hammer and chisel. There are some gorgeous types of limestone out there and, perhaps because it is a more subdued pallet, it can be extremely rewarding to experiment with textures on a limestone surface.

    “Dying Cockroach”, Pyrophyllite, 4” X 4” X 2”, 2013   Stephanie RobisonFor me the process of sculpting and carving stone is an influx moment, based on a continuous searching of the materials’ intrinsic qualities and its possibilities for expression. Finding the process itself conducive to further experimentation, I enjoy combining materials and forms that quite often contradict their final aesthetic/functional appearance such as: marble that is carved to appear soft and fabric that is sewn to be rigid and architecturally structured. In order to emphasize this visual reverse play between materials, I also reevaluate the potential of various colors and textures of stone. Pink marble won my devotion early on; the color was exciting, fleshy, playful and worked well with the soft, stacked, pillow-like forms I was creating. I found yellow marble intriguing to work with because its color could be both repulsive and beautiful at the same time. I search for stone that has attractive color but not the show-stopping kind. A solid color is best – something I can work with that doesn’t scream out “Look at me I am a beautiful piece of stone!!” My desire is for people to recognize and enjoy the forms I am creating before understanding or knowing the material it is created from.

    I have huge respect for chlorite as a carving stone due to the contrast in color between a finished and unfinished surface. I found it rewarding to go from the greenish-gray to a beautiful polished black surface. Occasionally, I work with alabaster but it tends to be too high-maintenance for my liking. I find myself resenting having to put a pillow under it and treat it gently. And sanding Alabaster is torturous. Although admittedly, I still have lustful feelings toward the orange variety and, since it is now hard to get ahold of, I deem it alone worthy of the tender attentiveness required.

    I definitely have a soft spot for pyrophyllite, commonly called Wonderstone. It comes in all kinds of fun colors and (almost) effortlessly takes fine detail. Sanding and polishing are two of my least favorite activities but this type of stone is actually fun to sand! You can clearly see when you need to change grits and are quickly rewarded with brilliant saturated color. Although, I have carved pieces of Wonderstone as large as 180lbs I prefer to work this stone into small sculptures.

    I enjoy doing work that is both additive and subtractive, often creating one sculpture from multiple parts of different colors of pyrophyllite.
  • Suttle Lake Sculpture Show

    Northwest Stone Sculptors Association 1st Annual Outdoor Sculpture Show2015 Sculpture ShowUnique Stone Carvings by Professional Artists from around the world!

    Saturday, August 29th, 2015
    11 am - 4 pm

    Suttle Lake Camp
    29551 SW
    Suttle Lake Loop
    Sisters, OR 97759


    Join the members of the Northwest Stone Sculptors Association for an inaugural outdoor sculpture show & afternoon exhibition of their work. Artists will be on site to discuss their art, techniques and stone. Many of the sculptures are offered for sale. Visit with us to learn about and enjoy the wonderful work of this thriving community of artists.

    This event is free to the public.